Mr. Barry Donohoe




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BP Donohoe's Home Page
Psychology & Sociology 






After teaching  Social Studies at WAMS for sixteen years, and two years as  the 8th Grade counselor, my current assignment is teaching World History and Psychology.  In helping students reach their full potential, the village includes parents/guardians, teachers, and all school personnel working in concert to assist the students in charting their course.  

Psychology - focuses on individual human behavior and developing a better understanding of interpersonal relationships. The intersection of how cognition and emotion effect behavior will be a central focus. The course will culminate with the study on of various psychological disorders. The study of psychology is relevant to our understanding of how feelings can motivate and influence our behaviors. Students will increase their skills of critical thinking and analysis through research and discussion. Students will be expected to exhibit these skills through the use of research projects, essays, and project- based assessments. 

Sociology- is the science of studying the social lives of people, groups and societies' behavior as social beings. The course will cover everything from the analysis of short contacts between anonymous individuals on the street to the study of global social processes. Group and independent projects will study social aggregations, and the entities through which humans move throughout  their lives'.


Psychology is the scientific, systematic study of individual human behavior and experience.

 Objectives

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the content, terminology, methodology, and application of the discipline. Additionally, to explore the major concepts and theories of psychology, and introduce career opportunities associated with the attainment of further education in the field of study.

 Resources

There is no supplied textbook for Psychology. Instructor will use notes derived from the American Psychological Association (APA) to support and explain the major theories of Psychology, in addition to selected readings from periodicals, newspapers, internet resources and articles from professional journals to construct meaning about psychological theory and concepts.

 Grades

A total points system (not weighted) is used to derive student grades. Grades are a compilation of (APA) note taking, open note writing assignments. Inventories and other classroom assignments designed measure specific traits relating to the unit of study, and research projects are also included in student grades. Students may access the Sapphire portal to check their grades. Work must be submitted on time or receive a reduced grade per school board policy. Grades are updated by 8:00 Friday morning each week.

 Assessment

Projects constitute the majority of assessed content and may require work beyond the classroom/library time is not used judiciously. Research projects/presentations will include: Abraham Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs/Goal Setting, research of a self-selected Psychological Disorder and presentation of project. The selection of a prominent psychologist and the theories and concepts associated with them and/or the research of a self-selected career in Psychology may also be included- as time allows. Periodic vocabulary quizzes will be used to reinforce learned content and concepts. Students will rarely have homework, when assigned it is important to complete to allow for the collection of data used to support classroom experiments and lessons.

 Outline

Units of study include: An introduction to the history and applications of Psychology, an overview of the major theories and theorists, motivation, personality, intelligence, memory & cognitive process, Psychodynamic Theory, disorders & treatments.

                 Expectations Classroom assignments and discussion form the basis of this class and students are expected to be present, and contribute in a respectful, introspective manner as much as they are able- to optimize transfer of learning and to facilitate student growth. 


Sociology is the scientific, systematic study of society, human behavior, and experience.

 Objectives

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the content, terminology, methodology, and application of the discipline. Additionally, to explore the major concepts and theories of Sociology, and introduce career opportunities associated with the attainment of further education in the field of study.

 Resources

There is no supplied textbook for Sociology. A classroom set of textbooks will be used periodically for reference, in addition to selected readings from periodicals, newspapers, internet resources and articles from professional journals to construct meaning about sociological theory and concepts.

 Grades

A total points system (not weighted) is used to derive student grades. Grades are a compilation of (APA) note taking, open note writing assignments. Inventories and other classroom assignments designed measure specific traits relating to the unit of study, and research projects are also included in student grades. Students may access the Sapphire portal to check their grades. Work must be submitted on time or receive a reduced grade per school board policy. Grades are updated by 8:00 Friday morning each week.Assessment

Projects constitute the majority of assessed content and may require work beyond the classroom/library time is not used judiciously. Research projects/presentations will include:  a self-selected topic on culture/subculture, the selection of a prominent sociologist and the theories and concepts associated with them. Additionally, the implementation of an oral history project recorded students personal mobile device and uploaded to the Story Corps/Library of Congress website. Vocabulary assignments will be used to reinforce learned content and concepts. Students will rarely have homework, when assigned it is important to complete to allow for contextual understanding to support classroom lessons.

 Outline

Units of study include: An introduction to the history and applications of Sociology, an overview of the major theories and theorists, gender roles & stereotyping, social structure and interaction, cultural diversity and the United States/World, mass media and social life, deviance and social control, social change and social movements

 Expectations

Classroom assignments and discussion form the basis of this class and students are expected to be present, and contribute in a respectful, introspective manner as much as they are able- to optimize transfer of learning and to facilitate student growth.

 

Biography

   
 *  Graduated from Bethesda -Chevy Chase High School, Bethesda, MD (1976)
    * Bachelor of Arts -  Sociology, Mount Saint Mary's College,  Emmitsburg, MD (1980)
    * Pennsylvania Teaching Certificate , Wilson College , Chambersburg, PA (1994)
    * Master of Science in Education, Wilkes University (2000)
* Master of Science in Counseling at McDaniel College, Westminster, MD (2011)
    * SAP (Student Assistance Program ) Representative
         * Husband (to a strong woman) and father to one (above average) child.
 * cabinetmaker, boatbuilder, sailor/navigator.


Educational Career:
**"Dancing Bear" at Renfrew Institute for Environmental and Cultural 
    Studies, Waynesboro, PA (1992-1996)
**Waynesboro Area Senior High School - student teaching and long term 
   substitute positions in Social Studies and English (1994-1996)
**Waynesboro Area Middle School -  8th Grade Social Studies (1996-Present)
**Waynesboro Area Middle School - 8th Grade Counselor
**Waynesboro Area High School - 10th, 11th. 12th Grade Social Studies


717.762.1191 Ext. 1200

barry_donohoe@wasdpa.org

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